Dreams and Ayurveda: A Deeper Look

by Monica Gisella
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We might be conditioned to think that dreams are unimportant.

However, exploring the world of dreams is a wonderful way to know more about ourselves, our motives, desires, and fears.

They are a pathway to get in touch with our subconscious, which for just a few hours is allowed to wander freely in other dimensions, without the guidance and control of the conscious — often rigid— mind.

The messages we get from these unrestrained nightly adventures, if paying attention, can be revealing.

This is the Ayurvedic take on dreams.

dreams and ayurveda

The spirituality behind dreaming

Whether we remember them or not, we all dream.

According to the Hawaiian tradition, the spirit breaks free and goes elsewhere when we are immersed in a deep, sound sleep.

We visit other dimensions — in which we tend to be more active than this reality.

See other spirits.

Engage in adventures.

And receive messages from our Higher Self.

These messages can give us foreknowledge of things to come, or they might provide us with insights about our spiritual progress. Sometimes, they can display the light and darkness within us.

It is a shame we don’t remember all of our dreams. In part because we lose valuable information we could definitely use to better understand our psyches. But also because we dream about one third of our lives. Not remembering what we experienced during such a vast amount of time means wasted opportunities to learn, balance, and heal our minds.

Ayurveda and dreams

Watch this video to learn more about the world of dreams

The connection between Dreams and Ayurveda is strong.

The world’s oldest health system teaches us that our dominant dosha — Vata, Pitta, or Kapha — plays a key role in the content of our dreams.

Vata types have the most restless dreams, which often become nightmares.

They usually involve flying, falling down, death of loved ones, snakes, moving, being paralyzed with intense fear, and abstract imagery. It’s common that in these dreams we are the victim of an attack or secluded in a frightening place.

Pitta constitution has more realistic dreams. Nevertheless, they are full of passion and conflict.

Pitta dreams can present mystery and intrigue, as well as elements of aggression, struggle, challenges, jealousy, and fights. Often, they take place in summer and focus on intellectual activity, eating, violence, problem-solving, or situations where there is shame.

Kapha individuals have peaceful, placid dreams.

But, Kaphas often do not remember their dreams at all. These dreams may take place in winter or spring and involve snow, romance, finding money, enjoying sweets, doing the same work repeatedly, being late, a vision of themselves dead, and satisfying subconscious desires.

Interpreting dreams

Relying on books or websites of dream interpretation is not a good idea, as they dogmatically conclude that certain images always mean the same things.

However, your dreams are unique to you.

As such, they require your thoughtful consideration.

When a dream is unclear, you can ask your subconscious, before sleeping or meditating, to make it easier to interpret.

Another way of interpreting dreams involves acting out, in your imagination, the role of each element in the dream to understand what it reveals. From that vantage point, you could discover their purpose in being there and the message they are trying to communicate to you.

Or you could simply evaluate the meaning you personally give to those elements in the dream. For instance, for you, a tiger might evoke feelings of danger. When you do this with every element, the interpretation of the dream can become clear.

Remembering your dreams

To benefit from dreams, we must remember them.

Do one of these things to train your subconscious to help you recall the content of your dreams.

  1. Ask your subconscious, clearly and firmly, to help you remember your dreams.
  2. Keep a piece of paper and pen close to your bed so that you can annotate your dreams as soon as you remember them.
  3. Occasionally, a forgotten dream is remembered when your body takes the position you had while dreaming it. Therefore, if you wake up without recalling what you’ve dreamed, just try several sleeping positions and lie quietly in each for a few moments until the memories appear.
  4. The Law of Attraction dictates that whatever we think about, we attract. So, think about dreams, read about them, and observe the contents of your mind.

If you are interested in training your subconscious and reprogramming your mind, check this blog on Ayurveda and self-hypnosis.

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